ThriventGrantGroup

I’ve written about my love for my knitting groups before. I love to encourage people to knit. Some people might say I’m a pusher. They wouldn’t be wrong. So when I found a couple of knitter friends at my work place, I was the first in line to suggest a casual weekly knitting group over lunch. Eventually someone suggested that as a group, we knit hats to donate. Then that same someone suggested maybe we could apply for some grant she had heard about to purchase yarn and needles to teach others to knit.

ThriventGrantPacket

The packet they send is full of everything you need to use the gran. Plus, as a graphic designer, I love that it’s beautifully designed.

If you’re Lutheran and from the Midwest, you’ve probably heard of Thrivent (or Lutheran Brotherhood as they were known eons ago). They are known as an organization that gives a lot of money back to the community. It was from a student (who also works for Thrivent) that we learned about Action Teams.

I’ll be honest, at first I didn’t think too much about this. Cool, they will give us a small grant and we can utilized it to #LiveGenerously (their official hashtag) in our community. It was easy to apply and Thrivent sent us everything (including really nice, soft t-shirts. SCORE!). As I dug into the information they sent, I became more excited. Our group received $250. Not a lot in the grand giving scheme of the world. But just enough to buy needles and yarn to knit dozens of hats to give to a local emergency room. It might be warming up here, but winter in Minnesota is inevitable and the need for warm outerwear will be high once again. Plus, a dozen people (many going into ministry work themselves) will learn how to knit and will have the ability to knit more hats.

ThriventGrantSelfie

With long arms, come weirdly proportioned selfies.

With Lion Brand Yarn’s permission (they replied to my Tweet DM right away. Thank you!), our knitting group shared the pattern for my favorite, Ed’s Hat. It’s an easy project to learn to knit with and because of the size 13 needles, the project will finish up quickly; a must for new knitters (one experienced knitter already completed a hat a few days after we handed out the supplies).

As a side note: By the time I reach my grave, I’m estimating 100 percent of the population of the upper Midwest will have a hand-knit Ed’s Hat in their house.

Another selfie! I probably take too many selfies. Everyone put on their t-shirt and let me take a picture for my blog. Those are really nice t-shirts. I’m bummed that a couple of people were cut out of the picture, though.

We had five people who had never knit before. I’ve never taught a group of people to knit and on our first day and I only had about 15-20 minutes to show them a basic knit stitch. We haven’t even started on the hat! I hope they all return for a longer lesson next time. Also, I think I might have found a new hobby: teaching people to knit!

If you had $250 in seed money for a special charity project, how would you use it? Let me know in the comments below. And if you’ve ever participated in an Action Teem, feel free to share your project in the comments as well.